Two bedtime stories

Sometime little miracles happen and I would like to share two stories that I`ve collected these days.

Few days ago I got an email from Cindy, one of my blog readers that I have never met. It was also the first time she wrote directly to me, asking for some more thoughts on “how women will be effected by this uprising“. I`ve immediately thought to address her to the work of my friend Mona Eltahawy, an Egyptian journalist based in NY who is one of the most thoughtful person I know on this issue.

That very day Mona appeared on the media talking exactly about women and the Egyptian uprising, so I forwarded Cindy the link which Mona sent through Twitter.

Then I sent her this beautiful poster whose original author I ignore but it has been circulating on Twitter for a while and it`s a symbolic statement of the women`s role in #Jan25 #TahrirSquare protests.

I`ve just found in my mailbox an update from Cindy, where she tells me about a 200 people march to support Egypt that took place today in Portland, Oregon.

She sent me some beautiful pictures of the march and concluded :“Hope the Egyptian people know that there are lots of American’s who support them 100% in their fight to oust Mubarak”.

Then I`ve discovered “my 73 year old father at Tahrir” through my Bahraini friend Amira Al Husseini who works for Global Voices and who`s on Twitter 24 hrs a day to help Egyptian activists to cover the uprising.

Amira has reported about the story of Nadia el Awady and her father, a 73 years old father who is a bearded conservative Muslism. Nevertheless he wanted to be brought out at Tahrir Square to join the protests and attend a Coptic mass celebration.

picture by @NadiaE

You have to read the all article which is such a moving story. In one of her tweets, Nada says:

@NadiaE: dad talked to family and said: I’ve seen 3 Egyptian flags in my time. This 4th will say freedom, justice, equality

Despite what many want us to believe, there`s still room in this world for dialogue and mutual understanding, for messages of peace and solidarity that cross the world from the US to Egypt, from Christians to Muslims.

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